Csilla Ariese. Practicing Decoloniality: Museum Examples to Inspire Cultural Actors

Practicing decoloniality in the museum is the many approaches through which the current day hooks of the colonial beast are untangled from the museum institution. In this presentation, we discuss the challenges of decolonizing museums and present our upcoming book with many different practical examples to help museums find ways to decolonize.

The upcoming publication “Practicing Decoloniality: A Practical Guide with Examples from Museums” by Csilla Ariese and Magdalena Wróblewska is a part of the ECHOES project which has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme.

Csilla Ariese

Csilla Ariese is a museologist specialized in community engagement and practicing decoloniality. She is working as a postdoc to study how the Amsterdam Museum is dealing with its colonial past. The topic of her Ph.D. is “The Social Museum in the Caribbean: Grassroots Heritage Initiatives and Community Engagement”. Magdalena Wróblewska is an art historian, specialist on modern art and culture, focusing on museology and photography’s history and theory. She obtained her Ph.D. degree in 2013 from the Department of History at the University of Warsaw, Poland. Her dissertation focuses on the role photographic reproductions played in the emancipation of art history as an independent academic discipline in the early 19th century. One chapter is devoted to the relation between early photography and colonial heritage. Magdalena is also interested in Central-Eastern European perspectives of colonial heritage, especially in connection to the museum practices.

Magdalena Wróblewska

Magdalena Wróblewska is art historian, a specialist of modern art and culture, with special focus on museology and photography’s history and theory. She obtained her PhD degree in 2013 at the Department of History in the University of Warsaw, Poland. Her dissertation focused on the role that photographic reproductions played in emancipation of art history as independent academic discipline in early 19th century. One chapter is devoted to relation of early photography and colonial heritage. Wróblewska is also interested in Central-Eastern European perspectives of colonial heritage, especially with connection to the museum practices.

This event is a part of the project educational course. Learn more about the course here.